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Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer

CHRISTMAS, HOLIDAYS & SPECIAL OCCASIONS

Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer


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=== Demonstrating that You Care ===

 

=== Demonstrating that You Care ===

#Be a good listener. Once of the best ways to show your support is by letting your friend know that you are ready to listen. Tell her that you understand that she may not want to talk about her illness, but that when she does, you’ll be there. Don’t assume that your friend already knows this. It’s always welcome to hear that someone is ready to be there for you.<ref>https://www.mskcc.org/blog/10-tips-supporting-friend</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 1 Version 2.jpg|center]]

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#Be a good listener. of the best ways to show your support is by letting your friend know that you are ready to listen. Tell her that you understand that she may not want to talk about her illness, but that when she does, you’ll be there. Don’t assume that your friend already knows this. It’s always welcome to hear that someone is ready to be there for you.<ref>https://www.mskcc.org/blog/10-tips-supporting-friend</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 1 Version 2.jpg|center]]

 

#*Be an active listener. Don’t just listen, participate in the conversation. Indicate that you are engaged by responding with nods of the head, maintaining eye contact, and making appropriate facial expressions.

 

#*Be an active listener. Don’t just listen, participate in the conversation. Indicate that you are engaged by responding with nods of the head, maintaining eye contact, and making appropriate facial expressions.

 

#*Ask questions. Don’t interrupt your friend, but at appropriate pauses, ask questions to indicate that you are listening. Try saying something like, “So, you’ll be going for treatment three days a week, right? Will you have a set schedule, or will it vary?”

 

#*Ask questions. Don’t interrupt your friend, but at appropriate pauses, ask questions to indicate that you are listening. Try saying something like, “So, you’ll be going for treatment three days a week, right? Will you have a set schedule, or will it vary?”

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#Ask what you can do. Often, the best way to know how you can help is to ask your friend what they need. You can also ask specific questions, such as “Do you need a ride to your chemo appointment?” This will let them know that you are willing to do specific tasks, and you’re not just making a vague offer.<ref>http://www.cancer.net/coping-with-cancer/talking-with-family-and-friends/supporting-friend-who-has-cancer</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 5 Version 2.jpg|center]]

 

#Ask what you can do. Often, the best way to know how you can help is to ask your friend what they need. You can also ask specific questions, such as “Do you need a ride to your chemo appointment?” This will let them know that you are willing to do specific tasks, and you’re not just making a vague offer.<ref>http://www.cancer.net/coping-with-cancer/talking-with-family-and-friends/supporting-friend-who-has-cancer</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 5 Version 2.jpg|center]]

 

#*If your friend has children, offer to take them off of their hands once or twice a week. They can get some rest and you can provide the kids with some fun.

 

#*If your friend has children, offer to take them off of their hands once or twice a week. They can get some rest and you can provide the kids with some fun.

#Do small things. Sometimes we take for granted our ability to complete what seem like ordinary, everyday tasks. When your friend is diagnosed with cancer, they might feel overwhelmed by every day life. Offer to help run simple errands, such as going to the post office or dry cleaners’.<ref>http://www.cancer.org/treatment/understandingyourdiagnosis/talkingaboutcancer/whensomeoneyouknowhascancer/when-somebody-you-know-has-cancer-offering-support</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 6 Version 2.jpg|center]]

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#Do small things. Sometimes we take for granted our ability to complete what seem like ordinary, everyday tasks. When your friend is diagnosed with cancer, they might feel overwhelmed by life. Offer to help run simple errands, such as going to the post office or dry cleaners’.<ref>http://www.cancer.org/treatment/understandingyourdiagnosis/talkingaboutcancer/whensomeoneyouknowhascancer/when-somebody-you-know-has-cancer-offering-support</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 6 Version 2.jpg|center]]

 

#*Often, our natural instinct is to send food (and lots of it) when someone is sick. Unfortunately, cancer patients offer suffer from a loss of appetite. Instead of loading them down with casseroles, ask your friend if you can go grocery shopping for them. Have them provide a list of things that sound good to them.

 

#*Often, our natural instinct is to send food (and lots of it) when someone is sick. Unfortunately, cancer patients offer suffer from a loss of appetite. Instead of loading them down with casseroles, ask your friend if you can go grocery shopping for them. Have them provide a list of things that sound good to them.

 

#Talk to the family. Remember, it’s not just your friend who is going through a tough time.Their family is also going through a very emotional situation. Try talking to their spouse, parents, or kids, if appropriate. Let them know that you are there to lean on and offer to help in any way that you can.<ref>https://www.mskcc.org/blog/10-tips-supporting-friend</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 7.jpg|center]]

 

#Talk to the family. Remember, it’s not just your friend who is going through a tough time.Their family is also going through a very emotional situation. Try talking to their spouse, parents, or kids, if appropriate. Let them know that you are there to lean on and offer to help in any way that you can.<ref>https://www.mskcc.org/blog/10-tips-supporting-friend</ref>[[Image:Support Someone Diagnosed With Cancer Step 7.jpg|center]]

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== Tips ==

 

== Tips ==

 

*Take breaks. Even during periods of intense, hands-on care, you need refresher breaks. Get someone else to stand in for those times so that you can go out and do something different from bedside vigils, chemotherapy ward duty, listening to worries all day long. You will be better for it and more likely to remain understanding and helpful as a result.

 

*Take breaks. Even during periods of intense, hands-on care, you need refresher breaks. Get someone else to stand in for those times so that you can go out and do something different from bedside vigils, chemotherapy ward duty, listening to worries all day long. You will be better for it and more likely to remain understanding and helpful as a result.

*Talk about new and interesting things, not just about the disease. Try to distract them from thinking about if it seems lie they need a break.

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*Talk about new and interesting things, not just about the disease. Try to distract them from thinking about if it seems they need a break.

 

*There are times when you will probably feel resentful, angry, worn out. These are ”normal” feelings and they don’t last.

 

*There are times when you will probably feel resentful, angry, worn out. These are ”normal” feelings and they don’t last.

   



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